2470 stories
·
0 followers

MBA jackasses ruined Kiehl’s

1 Share

Sometime around 1999 or 2000, a stylish friend mentioned he had an elaborate skincare regime, and instead of mocking him (which would have been normal at the time, people were assholes back then), I was fascinated. So I asked for help. He mentioned soaps and scrubs and moisturizers and stuff for my under eye area.

This was all new to me, as a guy that probably washed his face with bar soap once in a while in the shower if I got super sweaty that day.

I remember him giving me a shopping list for a store in San Francisco that sold an old boring brand called Kiehl’s (“ignore the 1890’s aesthetics on their labels!” he assured me). He even gave me tips on where to find each product, so I didn’t wander in and think the place was not for me before walking out.

Soon after, I did it. I went in and bought it all. I had a daily face soap, a shower face scrub, then shampoo and conditioner and daily moisturizer and nightly stuff too. It was like a high end version of Dr. Bronner’s with ridiculous labels covered in text and their staff dressed in lab coats.

I liked it instantly because my face felt clean and soft and all my oiliness and greasiness that was there was gone. I can’t tell definitively if long term skincare use helps me but I feel better and people are regularly amazed when they hear I’m 50 years old.

I’ve been a customer at Kiehl’s for over 20 years and I still use half a dozen of their products, and each time I visit their stores, I probably spend $50-60. But 20 years on, each visit gets more difficult.

I don’t know anything about the company, but when I first shopped there, they were small, only in big cities, and made a wide range of products that never changed, with old school labels that exuded stability and history (their logo has “Since 1851” featured prominently). My favorite shampoo there was named after some Austrian guy who medaled in I want to say the 1960 Winter Olympics. I remember having to look it up once because I’d never heard of him.

But then I’m guessing they hired someone at the top or passed the company down to younger family that really wanted to go for it. Expand. Expand. Expand. Grow at all costs.

In the early 2000s, they started opening stores everywhere. By 2005 or so, they started launching tons of new products. Around 2010, they launched men’s lines of many products. Each time I visited a store, new stuff was everywhere and it was harder to find the stuff I always liked.

I often call this phenomena: The Curse of MBAs. You can almost sense the Excel sheets when you walk in a store where there are 100 new SKUs that you’re being pushed to try. And when you find out there are 25 local places to buy them instead of two in your entire state, like before. Then you start finding out your favorite items were canceled forever.

I’m sure no one else knew who the skier on the shampoo bottle from 1960 was because it was off the shelves over a decade ago. I moved to a men’s shampoo that isn’t as good but is similar enough. Every year, something I liked and used is no longer available. The face soaps keep disappearing and getting replaced by something not quite right. I’ve gone through half a dozen different hair styling products because none of them stick around.

A few years ago, L’Oreal bought Kiehl’s outright and it became another of their brands in their portfolio. Now the new products and cancellations come even faster. I currently have nothing to put in my hair after a shower to hold it because they no longer produce the gel I once used, then the wax paste, then the non-wax styling paste.

20 years on, I’m looking for alternatives. I hate it when overactive MBAs take over and a decent business that operated just fine for decades suddenly has to grow or die, and long time customers are the casualties.



Read the whole story
huskerboy
5 days ago
reply
Seattle
Share this story
Delete

The Bollard That Eats Cars

1 Share

This is a dangerous post! Not for any particular reason, but this post has claimed a lot of victims. A four-foot tall bollard in a Walmart parking lot in Auburn, Maine, attracts automobiles into its clutches far more often than probability would predict. They've tried painting it different colors, they've tried changing the traffic flow, but people keep ramming into the bollard. It's already a locallegend; and it's beginning to have global notoriety like the infamous 11' 8" bridge in Durham, North Carolina

There's a slideshow at reddit showing 20 of the accidents involving this bollard and the confounding damage. Why does it keep happening? The Sun-Journaltalked to driving instructor Andy Levesque, who said, “People make turns prematurely and cut corners.” That doesn't explain how cars manage to impale themselves on top of the bollard. Who drives fast enough to do that in a parking lot? -via Boing Boing

Read the whole story
huskerboy
9 days ago
reply
Seattle
Share this story
Delete

Bear Paw Battlefield in Chinook, Montana

1 Share

Bear Paw Battlefield

The National Park Service in the United States includes a number of historic battlefields. Many of these, especially the Civil War battlefields, are located near populous areas or major highways and are relatively easy to travel to.  But, the Bear Paw Battlefield, which is part of the Nez Perce National Historic Park, is in one of the most remote locations within the continental United States.

In 1877, the Nez Perce tribe (also known as nimiipuu) had been relocated to a reservation near Lewistown, Idaho.  Members of the tribe as well as other Native Americans had been the victims of murder and other crimes by white settlers in the area, so in mid-June, a few members of the tribe initiated a series of reprisal raids. This led to a series of violent events that escalated until the Nez Perce were in a full military conflict with the United States Army. However, the Nez Perce took a different approach than most other Native American tribes did in this situation: they fled.

Over the course of several months, the Nez Perce would travel 1,170 miles (1,880 km) over the Rocky Mountains, through Yellowstone National Park, and then northwards across Montana while trying to escape the United States Army and while trying to find some form of sanctuary. The tribe had fought several additional battles along the way, and in the process, they had taken many casualties and lost many belongings. However, the Nez Perce generally avoided committing any acts of violence against any white civilians that they encountered. Although several chiefs led the tribe, news accounts of the Nez Perce tended to focus on Chief Joseph because of his Christian name.

The tribe was on their way to Canada when, on September 30, American soldiers led by Colonel Nelson Miles caught up with them in a grassy coulee in the northern plains of Montana to the north of the Bears Paw Mountains. At this point in time, the Nez Perce and their horses were physically exhausted, and they were also exposed to the cold and snow. They continued to fight, but the members of the tribe were in no condition to continue resisting or to continue fleeing. On October 5, a day after another Army force led by General Oliver Howard arrived, Chief Joseph agreed to surrender with the majority of his tribe, although a minority of the Nez Perce were able to slip away the night before and reach refuge in Canada. In his surrender, Chief Joseph gave a speech with the notable declaration, “From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever."

In the years following the battle, the battlefield was not built upon or otherwise developed, so it remained relatively unchanged. In 1970, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places, and then in 1988, it became part of the National Park system. Today, the site features a few memorials and interpretative signs describing the battle as well as a loop trail around the coulee where the battle took place.

Read the whole story
huskerboy
12 days ago
reply
Seattle
Share this story
Delete

Racial Equality and Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

2 Shares

Actor and singer François Clemmons, who played Officer Clemmons for 30 years on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, talks about how and why Fred Rogers chose a black man to be a police officer on TV.

To say that he didn’t know what he was doing, or that he accidentally stumbled into integration or talking about racism or sexism, that’s not Mister Rogers. It was well planned and well thought-out and I think it was very impactful.

NPR also recently shared Clemmons’ story.

He says he’ll never forget the day Rogers wrapped up the program, as he always did, by hanging up his sweater and saying, “You make every day a special day just by being you, and I like you just the way you are.” This time in particular, Rogers had been looking right at Clemmons, and after they wrapped, he walked over.

Clemmons asked him, “Fred, were you talking to me?”

“Yes, I have been talking to you for years,” Rogers said, as Clemmons recalls. “But you heard me today.”

“It was like telling me I’m OK as a human being,” Clemmons says. “That was one of the most meaningful experiences I’d ever had.”

Mister Rogers always hits me right in the feels.

Tags:Francois Clemmons    Fred Rogers    racism    TV    video   
Read the whole story
huskerboy
17 days ago
reply
Seattle
Share this story
Delete

Passkeys: what they are, and how they work

1 Share
Passkeys: what they are, and how they work

We all use passwords every day to sign in to our devices and online accounts. But that doesn’t mean they’re a perfect solution.

If you don’t have a password manager, it can be challenging to create and remember hundreds of strong passwords. Many people give up and use the same password, or a few predictable passwords, which makes it easier for cybercriminals to hijack their accounts.

Enter passkeys. You may have heard of them in the news, and with good reason. Many companies (including 1Password!) are excited by this technology’s potential to be a simple, fast, and secure sign in solution for everyone. Here, we’ll break down what passkeys are, how they work, and some of the benefits they offer over traditional passwords.

What are passkeys?

Passkeys allow you to create online accounts and sign in to them without entering a password.

When passkeys are implemented correctly, you don’t have to type anything out. You don’t have to enter a two-factor authentication code. And you don’t have to worry about whether someone is trying to trick you with a scam website.

When passkeys are implemented correctly, you don’t have to type anything out.

Instead, you simply need your chosen authenticator – which, in the context of passkeys, could be your phone, tablet, or PC. Your device will ask you to authenticate using your face or fingerprint as a security measure, but that’s it.

By now, you’re probably thinking: “Okay, that sounds great. But how is this possible?” Let’s tackle that question next.

How passkeys work

Passkeys leverage an API called WebAuthn, or Web Authentication. The API was jointly developed by the FIDO Alliance, an open industry association that wants to reduce the world’s reliance on passwords, and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), a community that works together to develop new standards and guidelines for the web.

Instead of a traditional password, WebAuth uses public and private keys – otherwise known as public-key cryptography – to check that you are who you say you are. Public and private keys are mathematically linked to one another. You can think of them like interlocking puzzle pieces; they’re designed to go together, and you need both pieces to authenticate successfully.

As the name implies, the public key can be shared publicly. That means the website or app you want to sign in to can see and store your public key. The private key, meanwhile, is kept secret and safe. It’s used to decrypt data that’s been encrypted with your public key.

Unlike a traditional password, the private key is never shared with the site you want to sign in to, or stored on their servers.

How passkeys differ from what’s come before

WebAuthn isn’t a new idea. The project was started in 2016, and the WebAuthn Level 1 standard was published as a W3C recommendation three years later. Today, the API is supported by many browsers, including Chrome, Safari, and Edge.

But the standard is yet to go fully mainstream. Few websites offer a passwordless login experience right now, so most people still use a traditional username and password for all of their online accounts.

Passkeys make it easier for everyone to use passwordless authentication across all of their devices.

Passkeys make it easier for everyone to use passwordless authentication across all of their devices. Perhaps more importantly, they’re backed by influential technology companies including Apple, Google, Microsoft, and … us! By championing passkeys together, this group can raise awareness and, by extension, overall adoption around the world.

What happens when you create and use a passkey

Let’s break down how passkeys work in practice.

Imagine that you visit a website that supports passkeys. First, you create an account and choose the option to secure it with a passkey, rather than a traditional password.

The website’s server shares some information about the website, and asks you to confirm your authenticator. This could be your phone, tablet, PC … or, in the not so distant future, a password manager like 1Password. More on that later.

A passkey – which includes your public and private key pair – is then generated for that specific website. This happens locally, on your device. The public key is sent to the website’s server for storage, while the private key remains securely stored in your authenticator.

The next time you sign in, the website will create a “challenge,” which is a bit like a puzzle. Your authenticator will “sign” the challenge using your private key, then send the completed “signature” to the website. Finally, the website uses their copy of your public key to verify the signature’s authenticity.

And that’s it! You’ve signed in using your unique passkey.

The benefits of passkeys

Here are just a few reasons why passkeys are a simple and secure login solution:

  • Every passkey is strong by default. You don’t have to create anything manually, or worry about whether your private key is long or random enough. You simply create an account and allow your authenticator to generate a secure public and private key pair on your behalf.

  • You don’t have to remember or type out your passkeys. Your private key is stored on your device, and retrieved automatically when you want to sign in to your account. A copy of your public key is stored with the account provider so you never have to type it out or even autofill it.

  • Your private key is never shared with the website you want to sign in to. That means you don’t have to worry about how the website is storing your credentials, because the public key on its own can’t be used to gain access to your account even if it were to be stolen.

  • Your public key can’t be used to figure out your private key. If a criminal breaches a website’s servers, the best they can hope to find is your public key, which can’t be used to sign in to your account and can’t be reverse-engineered to reveal your private key.

  • Passkeys are a strong defense against phishing and social engineering attacks. Criminals will often create fake but seemingly authentic websites to try to trick you into sharing your login details. WebAuthn protects you by ensuring that you never share your credentials with untrusted websites.

1Password and passkeys

Here at 1Password, we’re excited by the potential of passkeys. That’s why we joined the FIDO Alliance, which includes other passkey supporters like Apple, Google, and Microsoft. Together, we have the opportunity to build safe, simple, and fast login solutions for everyone.

We’re already working to integrate passkeys into our password manager, so you can continue to manage and protect everything that’s important in your digital life. That includes passkeys, passwords, credit and debit cards, addresses, medical records, software license keys, documents, secure notes, and more.

The bottom line

Passkeys are a promising step forward for passwordless authentication. They make it simple to use your existing devices to sign in, rather than a hardware security key. (We love hardware security keys, but appreciate that many people don’t want to buy or carry around a separate device.)

If you want to learn more about our thoughts on passkeys, WebAuthn, and everything else related to passwordless authentication, check out:

Secure your digital life with 1Password

Keep all of your accounts secure with 1Password, the world’s most-trusted password manager. Get started today with a free 14-day trial.

Try free for 14 days
Read the whole story
huskerboy
29 days ago
reply
Seattle
Share this story
Delete

Sega's Lost 'Erotic Thriller' Has Been Found

1 Comment and 3 Shares

In the mid-90s, with the Saturn bombing and the video game landscape changing rapidly, Sega rolled the dice and made a few risky bets. One of those was, uh, sinking $3 million into the creation of an adult-oriented FMV game called Sacred Pools, that was so bad it ended up being binned before it was ever released.

Read more...

Read the whole story
huskerboy
30 days ago
reply
Seattle
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
fxer
35 days ago
reply
Thought for sure this was gonna be a dmack post replete with Sonic pregnant/kissing memes
Bend, Oregon
DMack
34 days ago
deviantart doesn't count as "lost"!
Next Page of Stories